Larry appeared Tuesday night on the PBS Newshour to debate the latest round of government seizures of domain names as part of a crackdown on unlicensed sports apparel.  Debating a lawyer from the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, Larry repeated his concerns about the legal process being utilized by Immigration and Customs Enforcement agents.  He also discussed serious flaws in two pieces of pending legislation that would expand government and private power to manipulate the Internet.

Video and transcript is available on the PBS Newshour website.

 

We've recently added over two dozen new posts to the Media page. Most have to do with SOPA, the Stop Online Piracy Act, introduced a few weeks ago in Congress to cheers from the entertainment industry and jeers from Silicon Valley. The bill would make it easier--too easy--for copyright and trademark holders to turn on and off Web content they don't like.

Larry's early analysis of the bill for CNET, and his on-going work on the poor relations between Hollywood and Palo Alto, led to a great deal of press coverage and speaking engagements. His detailed review of the bill was praised across the political spectrum, including by TechDirt's Mike Masnick and the National Review's Reihan Salam.

Larry participated in a Capitol Hill debate on SOPA and other pending piracy legislation sponsored by the Congressional Internet Caucus, debating the bill against industry representatives. He also appeared on CNET's Reporters' Roundtable and This Week in Law, as well as podcasts by the Heartland Institute.

Net neutrality also stayed in the news, as did the AT&T/T-Mobile merger, privacy, spectrum reform and online human rights. Larry was quoted in a wide range of publications on these topics, including Politico, Reason, NPR's Marketplace, the Wall Street Journal and the Daily Caller.  Conference footage from this year's Compass Summit panels on privacy and tech policy are also available.