What’s Holding Consumers Back from the Internet of Things?

In the current issue of Marketing Intelligence Review, Larry describes five common mistakes marketers and product developers are making in the nascent Internet of Things and how to solve them.

Given the multi-billion dollar potential for this new technology, overcoming these errors will be crucial for attracting wary consumers, who are already reacting poorly to security breaches, gimmicky products, and unbranded solutions.

The article can be read or downloaded from MIR.

Larry joins panelists at Churchill Club event June 28th on “unscaling” the industrial economy

On June 28th, Larry will join General Catalyst’s Hemant Taneja and author Kevin Maney to discuss their new book, “UnscaledHow AI and a New Generation of Upstarts Are Creating the Economy of the Future” at an event sponsored by The Churchill Club in downtown San Francisco.  As start-ups transform industries using lease-able infrastructure, consumers are benefiting.  But anxiety is also rising, as long-held assumptions about the nature of work, business, and community are also being disrupted.

Open Forum: The New World of Work: The Unraveling of Scale

Debating tech regulation, this week in The Economist

All this week, Larry is participating in a spirited on-line debate for The Economist, taking the “no” side of the question “Should the tech giants be more heavily regulated?”  Taking “yes” is author Andrew Keen, whose new book, “How to Fix the Future,” Larry reviewed earlier for The Washington Post.

Voting, which has so far heavily favored the “yes” side, continues through May 6th.

Larry and John Perry Barlow on Internet Privacy and Security – in 1995

As I noted in my article last week for Forbes, my first collaboration with the late John Perry Barlow, back in 1995, was a report on the privacy and security imperatives for the then-new concept of electronic commerce.

In Barlow’s memory, and in the wake of renewed concerns about these issues in Congress and the EU, we’ve made the report, “Five Privacy and Security Imperatives for Electronic Trade,” available here.  Just click on the link above to download it.

Sadly, little has changed in the last twenty-plus years.  All five recommendations are as valid today as they were when John and I first proposed them.